The Center for Safe and Healthy Schools (CSHS) is taking on the complex, urgent issue of school safety with comprehensive, evidence-based solutions focused on student well-being and learning success. At its core, our work is driven by the belief that all students deserve to go to school in safe and healthy environments where they can learn and thrive.

Led by the Johns Hopkins School of Education, our center brings together top faculty from across our university system—from education, public health, engineering, arts and sciences, nursing, and medicine—to collectively apply their expertise around evidence-based practices, programs, tools, and policies integral to safe and healthy school environments.

Through our work, we strive to move siloed conversations about pressing issues such as suicide, trauma, depression, bullying, and gun violence into a more holistic discussion about how we, as a nation, can make schools safer.

Suburban Schools, Urban Realities: Policy and Possibility at the Urban Fringe

During the two-day conference, attendees will collaborate and network with other experts in economics, education, history, law, political science, policy, and sociology on issues of equity and educational opportunity in suburban spaces. Attendees will also develop a transdisciplinary, peer-reviewed and -edited volume on metropolitan change and educational challenges This landmark conference at the Hopkins Bloomberg Center in Washington, D.C., will convene 25 of the nation’s most highly regarded thinkers working at the leading edge of scholarship on the urban realities of suburban life.

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Our Research

The research tells us that to truly make schools safer, we must approach challenges holistically. We build on our knowledge and tap our deep bench of experts to lead this collaborative effort and design effective, evidence-based solutions for districts and schools. Together, we explore three research areas fundamental to creating safer, healthier learning environments for all students: health and wellness, schools and community engagement, and school security and technology.

Our Research Faculty & Staff

Our center brings together faculty members from across Johns Hopkins University, from the School of Education to the School of Public Health. These multidisciplinary teams of experts share their collective knowledge and produce groundbreaking, life-changing research.

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Institute in Critical Quantitative, Computational, & Mixed Methodologies Institute

To meet the nation’s need for a larger Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) workforce, ICQCM seeks to broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in data science and other STEM fields.

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Explore ICQCM

Our mission advances scholars of color among those using data science methodologies and challenges those researchers to use those methods to dismantle structural racism.

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Academics & Professional Development

The innovative academic programs at the Johns Hopkins School of Education recognize the complex factors involved in ensuring that schools are safe learning environments where students can thrive. Not only do our graduate degree programs draw on the expertise of the CSHS team, but the center also offers a lecture series, certification program, and other initiatives that support the continued development of school leaders, educators, and counselors.

Safe & Healthy Schools Certification (K-12)

Available to educators, administrators, counselors, and education professionals around the nation, this micro-credentialing program explores key safety issues and addresses ways to safeguard learning communities.

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Graduate Program Curriculum

Health and safety in schools is embedded throughout the curriculum at the Johns Hopkins School of Education through core and elective coursework. Additionally, many doctoral students pursue research within the realm of school safety.

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