Accommodation Request Forms

Students can register for accommodations by submitting the following forms (Adobe Acrobat Reader required to view PDF forms) to the Student Disability Services office:

Documentation Guidelines

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

The following guidelines are taken from the Consortium on ADHD, copyright 1998.

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

Professionals conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses of ADHD must have training in differential diagnosis and the full range of psychiatric disorders. The following professionals would generally be considered qualified to evaluate and diagnose ADHD provided they have comprehensive training in the differential diagnosis of ADHD and direct experience with an adolescent or adult ADHD population:

  • Clinical psychologists
  • Neuropsychologists
  • Psychiatrists

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from a professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation:

The provision of all reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the impact of the student’s disabilities on his or her academic performance at a given time in the student’s life. Therefore, it is in the student’s best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation relevant to the student’s learning environment. Documentation should be recent — within the last three years.

A. Evidence of Early Impairment

Because ADHD is, by definition, first exhibited in childhood and manifests itself in more than one setting, historical and academic information must be gathered from the evaluator.

B. Evidence of Current Impairment

Diagnostic assessment should consist of more than a self-report; history of attentional symptoms, including evidence of ongoing impulsive/hyperactive or inattentive behavior that has significantly impaired functioning over time is critical in the diagnosis of ADHD.

C. Alternative Diagnoses and/or Explanations

Diagnostic assessment should examine the possibility of co-existing diagnoses. This process should explore possible alternative diagnoses including medical and psychiatric disorders as well as educational and cultural factors, which impact the individual and may result in behaviors mimicking ADHD.

D. Diagnostic Testing

Neuropsychological or psychoeducational assessment is critical in determining the current impact of the disorder on the individual’s ability to function in a school setting. Assessment must include standardized measures for inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity as delineated in the DSM-IV.

E. Diagnostic Report & Summary

The diagnostic report must be a comprehensive interpretive summary synthesizing the evaluator’s judgment for the diagnosis of ADHD. The report must include the following:

  • All quantitative information in standard scores and/or percentiles; all relevant developmental, medical, psychosocial, behavioral, academic, and medication information.
  • A specific diagnosis of ADHD based on the DSM-IV criteria. The report must identify the substantial limitation of a major life function presented by the ADHD
  • Specific recommendations for accommodations. Accommodations must be based on significant functional limitations and must be supported by the diagnostic assessment.
Blindless/Low Vision

(The following guidelines were developed with the assistance of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and the Colorado University Disability Services office)

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

Ophthalmologists are the primary professionals involved in diagnosis and medical treatment of individuals who are blind or experience low vision. Optometrists provide information regarding the measurement of visual acuity as well as tracking and fusion difficulties.

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation:

Documentation should include the following:

1. A clear statement of vision related disability with supporting numerical description. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s request for accommodations.

2. A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis and a summary of evaluation results including standardized scores.

3. Present symptoms that meet the criteria for diagnosis.

4. Medical information relating to the student’s needs and the status of the individual’s vision (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program.

5. Narrative or descriptive text providing both quantitative and qualitative information about the student’s abilities that might be helpful in understanding the student’s profile, including the use of corrective lenses and ongoing visual therapy (if appropriate).

6. Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the postsecondary level.

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

(The following guidelines were developed with the assistance of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and the Colorado University Disability Services office)

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

The evaluator of a deaf or hard-of-hearing individual should be an audiologist.

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation

Documentation should include the following:

1. A clear statement of deafness or hearing loss with an audiogram that has been completed within the last three years.

2. A summary of assessment procedures used to make the evaluation and a narrative summary of results.

3. Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the postsecondary level including types of interpreting services.

Head Injuries/Traumatinc Brain Injuries

(The following guidelines were developed with the assistance of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and the Colorado University Disability Services office)

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

Head injury or traumatic brain injuries are considered medical or clinical diagnoses. Individuals qualified to render a diagnosis for these disorders are practitioners who have been trained in the assessment of head injury or traumatic brain injury. Recommended practitioners may include physicians; neurologists; licensed clinical, rehabilitation, or school psychologists and neuropsychologists and psychiatrists.

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation:

Documentation should include the following:

  1. A clear statement of the head injury or traumatic brain injury and the probable site of lesion.
  2. Documentation for eligibility should be current, and should include information about condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s specific request for accommodations.
  3. A summary of cognitive and achievement measures including standardized scores or percentiles used to make the diagnosis.
  4. A summary of present residual symptoms that meet the criteria for diagnosis.
  5. Medical information relating to student’s needs to include the impact of medication on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment.
  6. Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the postsecondary level.
Learning Disabilities

The following guidelines are taken from the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD), copyright 1997, Columbus, OH

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

Professionals conducting assessments, rendering diagnoses of learning disabilities (LD), and making recommendations for appropriate accommodations must be qualified to do so. The following professionals would be qualified to evaluate specific learning disabilities provided they have additional training and experience in the assessment of learning problems in adults.

  • Clinical or educational psychologists
  • School psychologists
  • Neuropsychologists
  • Learning disability specialists

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator \
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation:

The provision of all reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the impact of the student’s disabilities on his or her academic performance. Therefore, it is in the student’s best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation (preferably within the past 4 years) relevant to the student learning environment.

The Diagnostic Report

Diagnosis

The report must include a clear statement of the learning disability, and the rationale for this diagnosis as supported by the current diagnostic battery. Individual “learning styles,” “learning differences,” “academic problems,” and “test difficulty or anxiety” do not constitute a learning disability. If the data indicate that a learning disability is not present, the evaluator should state that conclusion in the report. The diagnosis should include a DSM IV diagnosis.

Test Scores

Standard scores and/or percentiles should be provided for all normed measures. The data should logically reflect a substantial limitation to learning for which the student is requesting the accommodation. The particular profile of the student’s strengths and weaknesses must be shown to relate to functional limitations that may necessitate accommodations.

The tests used should be reliable, valid, and standardized for use with an adolescent/adult population. The test findings should document both the nature and severity of the learning disability.

Diagnostic Interview

The diagnostician, using professional judgment as to areas are relevant to the question of determining a students current eligibility for accommodation(s), must provide a summary that includes description of the presenting problems(s); developmental history; medical history, including the absence of a medical basis for the present symptoms; academic history including results of prior standardized testing; reports of classroom performance; relevant family history, including primary language of the home and the students current of fluency of English; relevant psychosocial history; relevant history; a discussion of dual diagnosis, alternative or co-existing mood, behavioral, neurological, and/or personality disorders along with any history of relevant medication use that may affect the individual’s and exploration of possible alternatives that may mimic a learning disability when, in fact, one is not present.

Assessment

The neuropsychological or psycho-educational evaluation for the specific learning disability must provide clear and specific evidence that a learning disability does or does not exist. Assessment, and any resulting diagnosis, must consist of and be based on a comprehensive assessment battery that does not rely on any one test or subtest.

Objective evidence of a substantial limitation to learning must be provided. The domains to be addressed must include the following:

1. Aptitude/Cognitive Ability

A complete intellectual assessment with all subtests and standard scores reported is essential.

2. Academic Achievement

A comprehensive academic achievement battery is essential, all subtests and standard scores reported for those subtests administered. The battery must include current levels of functioning in relevant areas such as reading (decoding and comprehension), mathematics, and oral and written language.

3. Information Processing

Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short and long memory; sequential memory; auditory and visual perception/processing; processing speed; executive functioning; motor ability) should be addressed.

Other assessment measures, such as classroom tests and informal assessment procedures or observations, may be helpful in determining performance across a variety of domains. Other formal assessment measures may be integrated with the above instruments to help rule in rule out the learning disability to differentiate it from coexisting neurological and/or psychiatric disorders (i.e., to establish a differential diagnosis). In addition to standardized tests, it is also very useful to include informal observations of the student during test administration.

Clinical Summary

A well-written diagnostic summary should indicate:

  • That the evaluator ruled out alternative explanations for academic problems as a result of poor education, poor motivation and/or study skills, emotional problems, attentional problems, and cultural/language differences.
  • How patterns in the student’s cognitive ability, achievement, and information processing reflect the presence of a learning disability.
  • The substantial limitation to learning or other major life activity presented by the learning disability and degree to which it impacts the individual in the learning context for which accommodations are being requested.
  • Why specific accommodations are needed and how the effects of the specific disability are accommodated.
Physical and Medical Disabilities

(The following guidelines were developed with the assistance of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and the Colorado University Disability Services office)

Evaluator’s Qualifications:

Any physical disability (include but not limited to mobility impairments, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, cancer, AIDS, chemical sensitivities, and spina bifida) are considered to be in the medical domain and require the expertise of a physician, including a neurologist, psychiatrist or other medical specialist with experience and expertise in the area for which accommodations are being requested.

It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted.

Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province inwhich the individual practices

Documentation:

The provision of all reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the impact of the student’s disabilities on his or her academic performance at a given time in the student’s life. Therefore, it is in the student’s best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation relevant to the student’s learning environment. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the student and the student’s request for accommodations.

Documentation should include the following:

  1. A clear statement of the medical diagnosis of the physical disability or medical illness.
  2. A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis, including evaluation results and standardized scores if applicable.
  3. A description of present symptoms that meet the criteria for diagnosis.
  4. Medical information relating to the student’s needs to include the impact of medication on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment.
  5. Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the postsecondary level. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis.
Psychiatric/Psychological Disabilities
(The following guidelines were developed with the assistance of the Association on Higher Education and Disability and the Colorado University Disability Services office) Evaluator’s Qualifications: A diagnosis by a licensed mental health professional including licensed clinical social workers, licensed professional counselor, psychologists, psychiatrists, and neurologists is required and must include the license number. Psychiatric and psychological disabilities include but are not limited to depressive disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder, and disassociative disorders. It is not considered appropriate for professionals to evaluate members of their families. Documentation from a family member will not be accepted. Reports from the professional should be submitted on letterhead and include the following:

  • Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator
  • Information about license or certification as well as the area of specialization
  • Number of years employed in current field
  • State/province in which the individual practices

Documentation: The provision of all reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the impact of the student’s disabilities on his or her academic performance at a given time in the student’s life. Therefore, it is in the student’s best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation relevant to the student’s learning environment. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the student and the student’s request for accommodations. Documentation should include the following:

  1. A clear statement of the disability, including the DSM-IV diagnosis and a summary of present symptoms.
  2. A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis and a summary of evaluation results, including standardized or percentile scores.
  3. Medical information relating to the student’s needs to include the impact of medication on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment.
  4. Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the postsecondary level.
 

After your requested accommodations have been reviewed and approved, complete the Request for Accommodations form each semester that you would like to receive accommodations by filling out the following form:

Students needing accommodations will be asked to provide to the university a comprehensive evaluation of a specific disability from a qualified diagnostician that

  • Identifies the type of disability
  • Describes the current level of functioning in an academic setting
  • Lists recommended accommodations

All documentation will be reviewed and reasonable accommodations will be provided based upon the student’s needs. Student Disability Services Office Jennifer Eddinger Phone: (410) 516-9734 Fax: (410) 516-9922 Email: soe.disabilityservices@jhu.edu