SOE Launches International Master’s Cohort

To meet the rising demand around the world for teachers trained in evidence-based educational practices, the Johns Hopkins School of Education has launched the International Teaching and Global Learning (ITGL) Cohort within its master of science in education program. Recruitment of candidates has begun in earnest in Asia, with a goal of enrolling the first cohort in Fall 2018.

Designed to be completed in 12 months of full-time study, the intensive, 33-credit curriculum offers three tracks of focus: early childhood, digital age teaching and learning, and creative and innovative education. The emphasis is to prepare educators to become skilled leaders capable of transforming schools, systems, and other fast-changing learning environments in their home countries.

“Other programs approach international education from an assimilation philosophy, with models and methods designed for Western education settings,” said Dean Christopher Morphew. “Our cohort is based on an integration philosophy unique among U.S. schools of education.”

In accordance with recommendations of the International Institute of Education, operator of the Fulbright Scholars program, the ITGL cohort model features wraparound student support, including services in housing, career development, academic advising, cultural enrichment, and mental health counseling. To maintain a holistic level of support among candidates from far-flung locales, many of these services will be administered by ACEE Global, a California-based firm specializing in international educational exchange programs.

“ACEE Global is a responsive, broadly experienced organization with a solid presence in Asia and a host of professional affiliations on the West Coast,” said R. Christopher Swanson, associate research scientist with the school’s Center for Technology in Education and a founder of the new initiative. “Their connections in internship settings are outstanding, and their expertise will be a huge benefit to our international degree candidates as they move into real-world educational leadership roles.”