School of Education Forms Partnership with Urban Teachers

The School of Education, ranked first in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, and Urban Teachers, one of the most rigorous alternative teacher certification programs in the United States, have formed a partnership to train new teachers for public schools using a clinical residency model similar to one used for preparing doctors.

“By preparing new teachers with the same high standards expected for doctors, the partnership will produce some of the best new educators in the country,” said David Andrews, dean of the School of Education.

The Urban Teachers and Johns Hopkins partnership will offer a Master of Science in Education with a concentration in educational studies that prepares new teachers to succeed in low-income and minority schools. The degree will offer new teachers training in general and special education, equipping them to meet the needs of all learners.

This collaboration will directly benefit schools most in need of committed teachers. On average, approximately 50 percent of all urban public school teachers leave the profession within three years of entering it.

“The program will offer aspiring teachers a 14-month residency in the classroom under the guidance of experienced teachers and expert faculty,” said Jennifer Green, CEO of Urban Teachers. “Together, our two innovative organizations will help improve the outcomes of thousands of students in urban settings by giving them the great teachers they deserve—teachers who are able to improve their learning.”

Founded in 2009, Urban Teachers links teacher effectiveness to certification eligibility. It currently serves urban youth in Baltimore City and the District of Columbia.

The School of Education offers programs in areas ranging from early childhood education to adult learning through its doctoral and graduate programs; research and development activities, external partnerships with school systems and educational entrepreneurs, and collaborative connections to the broader Johns Hopkins research community.