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Dr. Hardiman Published in Scientific Research, "Education and the Arts: Educating Every Child in the Spirit of Inquiry and Joy"

Addressing the decline of equitable arts instruction in American public schools, Dr. Hardiman posits the benefits of arts education and arts-integrated learning.  This paper touches upon the cognitive, academic, and sociological benefits that the arts bring to instruction to foster a generation of life-long learners.

Education and the Arts: Educating Every Child in the Spirit of Inquiry and Joy

NEI Book: The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st Century Schools - published

The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st Century SchoolsDr. Hardiman's new book - the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st Century Schools - has been published and is now available.

The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st-Century Schools serves as a bridge between research and practice by providing a cohesive, proven, and usable model of effective instruction. Compatible with other professional development programs, this model shows how to apply relevant research from educational and cognitive neuroscience to classroom settings through a pedagogical framework. The model’s six components are:

  1. Establish the emotional connection to learning
  2. Develop the physical learning environment
  3. Design the learning experience
  4. Teach for the mastery of content, skills, and concepts
  5. Teach for the extension and application of knowledge
  6. Evaluate learning

Mariale Hardiman presents this model with the educator in mind and offers practical steps for using it to inform instruction and teach 21st-century skills. Her valuable road map will help you achieve improved outcomes for your students and better collaborative professional practices in your school.

New York Times features Neuro-Education research

As part of a series called 'Your Brain on Computers', New York Times reporter Matt Richtel produced an audio slide show called "Images of a Distracted Brain". For the piece, Richtel participated in an experiment that mapped blood flow in his brain via an MRI while he played a video game. Read the full story on the study at NYTimes.com

BTT Professional Development

Two week-long BTT professional development workshops are being held this summer in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area.  The first one is co-organized by St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland, for teachers from private and public schools in the Washington, DC area.  The second workshop will train teachers at “Roots and Branches” – a new charter school in Baltimore which opens this fall and will use BTT as its pedagogical framework.  In addition, teachers from Northwood Elementary School  in Baltimore city received BTT professional development training during 2010-2011 school year.

Mind, Brain, and Teaching Certificate

The next face-to-face cohort of the Mind, Brain, and Teaching Certificate begins in the Summer of 2012 and applications are now being accepted.  The next online cohort will beginin Fall, 2013.

BTT Moves Across the Globe: Baltimore/DC to California to Greece

In May 2011, Dr. Hardiman was invited to present at the Sixth Annual Conference on Learning Differences sponsored in part by the Greek Ministry of Education and Stavros Niarchos Foundation.  American Community School in Athens, the conference organizer, is interested in implementing the Brain-Targeted TeachingTM as their instructional framework.

http://www.acs.gr/6th-annual-conference/

In June 2011, Dr. Hardiman traveled to California to meet with the representatives from the Disney Corporation, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation, Sony Screen Gems, the California State Summer School for the Arts, the Los Angeles Partnership Schools, and others, who are excited about the BTT and interested in learning more and using it in their work.

Research Studies

Two school-based research studies are underway. The first study, conducted during 2010-2011 school year, investigates how knowledge of brain science influences teachers’ instructional practices.  The second study, which will start in the fall of 2011, looks at the effects of Arts Integration on students’ memory for content.

The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. In our new article “Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Science Meets Pedagogy” we explore unique ethical issues that neuroeducation raises for five different groups of individuals: a) practicing teachers, b) neuroscience researchers whose work could inform education, c) publishers and the popular media, d) educational policy-makers, and e) university-level teacher educators. We suggest ways in which these ethical challenges can be met and provide a model for teacher preparation that will enable teachers themselves to translate findings from the neuro-and cognitive sciences and use legitimate research to inform how they design and deliver effective instruction.

Brain Research May Produce Results in the Classroom
Washington Post, October 28, 2008

Project Aims to Bridge Neuroscience and Schools
Education Week, October 8, 2008

School of Education Launches Neuro-Education Inititiave
JHU Gazette, May 27, 2008

Edutopia Magazine reports on SOE's Neuro-Ed Initiative
Edutopia Magazine, December 3, 2008 -George Luca Educational Foundation

In recent years, the practice of arts integration—the use of arts activities to teach content in core subject areas—has steadily gained in popularity. However, explanations for why arts integration is useful as a pedagogical tool tend to be muddled. In response, Rinne, Gregory, Yarmolinskaya, and Hardiman (2011) lay out a clear case for the effectiveness of arts integration in their recently published article, “Why Arts Integration Improves Long-Term Retention of Content.” This groundbreaking paper explains how arts integration leverages a variety of factors long known in cognitive psychology to improve memory for information. Armed with the arguments provided by Rinne et al., educators now have a clear rationale for teaching though the arts, which will help ensure that arts integration is not just the next passing fad, but rather is recognized as the powerful instructional tool that it is.

The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. In our new article “Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Science Meets Pedagogy” we explore unique ethical issues that neuroeducation raises for five different groups of individuals: a) practicing teachers, b) neuroscience researchers whose work could inform education, c) publishers and the popular media, d) educational policy-makers, and e) university-level teacher educators. We suggest ways in which these ethical challenges can be met and provide a model for teacher preparation that will enable teachers themselves to translate findings from the neuro-and cognitive sciences and use legitimate research to inform how they design and deliver effective instruction.