Evidence-Based Teaching in the Health Professions

The 18-credit Post-Master’s Certificate in Evidence-Based Teaching in the Health Professions, with its emphasis on preparing health professionals to teach effectively, can be taken as a stand-alone program or as the first component of the Master of Education in the Health Professions. Applicants for the post-master’s certificate are required to hold an advanced degree (master’s or higher) in the health professions or in a related field.

The six certificate courses include:

  • Foundation to Innovation: Adult Learning
  • Evidence-Based Teaching
  • Ensuring Learning through Assessment and Feedback
  • Curriculum Development
  • Instructional Strategies I (1.5 credits)
  • Instructional Strategies II (1.5 credits)
  • Educational Scholarship: Design (1.5 credits)
  • Educational Scholarship: Implementation (1.5 credits)

Students who complete the certificate can go on to complete the Master of Education in the Health Professions degree by selecting one of the two specialization options: Educational Research in the Health Professions or Educational Leadership in the Health Professions. Visit our course sequence/descriptions page for more information on the courses required for both the certificate and full Master’s degree.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE

In accordance with US Department of Education regulations, the JHU School of Education is required to disclose graduation rate data, median loan debt data, and other select information for all Title IV eligible gainful employment (GE) programs. To see the most recent data available for this GE program, please view the attached disclosure.

State-specific Information for Online Students

Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs.

Contact Us

Ms. Margaret Shamer
P: (410) 516-5265
mehp@jhu.edu

If you’re looking to be a leader in education, particularly medical education, the MEHP program really provides you with those tools, and to learn the theory behind adult learners.

 -Rachel Salas, M.D.
Associate Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University