Skip Navigation
Vol. VIII No. 1, Spring 2010 - Contributor Biographies

Meet Our Contributors:

 
  • Dr. Linda S. Adamson, Ed. D.

    Adamson PhotoDr. Adamson, like many of the graduate students she teaches, is a career changer into education, having worked in systems analysis and computer programming in government and industry. She taught elementary grades in a variety of settings in Maryland and was selected as the state’s Teacher of the Year and a Milken Family Foundation National Educator in 1994. She began working with Professional Development Schools (intensive partnerships between university teacher education programs and schools) as a teacher and has extended that work to her career at JHU. She has served in several capacities in the Maryland Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, including as the organization’s president. In her life beyond JHU, Dr. Adamson volunteers as the education coordinator of a long-term partnership between an Annapolis, MD, church and a small group of rural Mayan villages in Guatemala. Her primary research interest is action research/data-informed instruction. Current initiatives include effective technology integration to support 21st Century teaching and learning, and exploring opportunities to expand School of Education programs and influence nationally and internationally.

    Correspondence: adamson@jhu.edu or call 410-516-9775
    Program Coordinator
    Department of Teacher Preparation
    Johns Hopkins University School of Education
    6740 Alexander Bell Dr., Suite 180
    Columbia, MD 21046



    Article: Action Research: A Protocol to Improve Student Learning

    Back to top

     
  • Marisa Carrillo

    Carrillo Photo Ms. Carrillo is currently studying at Johns Hopkins University School of Education for a Master’s Degree in Special Education with a certificate in Autism and a certificate in Early Childhood Intervention. She received a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education from Dowling College in Oakdale, New York. Since relocating from New York to Baltimore in 2007, Marisa has been teaching an Intermediate Functional Academic Learning Supports (FALS) class for Baltimore County Public Schools. She has experience working with children who have all types of special needs such as autism, intellectual disability, emotional disability and other health impairments.

    Correspondence: ris0307@yahoo.com

    Read her Article: One Easy Tool, Many Informal Assessments: Technology Resources for You to Assess IEP Goals

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Barbara Kaplan Bass, Ph.D.

    Bass Photo Dr. Bass is director of the Maryland Writing Project at Towson University where she also teaches writing and American literature. Her personal essays have been published in the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore’s Child, The Chesapeake Reader, and Nesting: It’s a Chick Thing, amongst other places. Her professional essay have appeared in such publications as The Maryland English Journal, The Virginia English Journal, The Exercise Exchange: A Journal for Teachers of English in High Schools and Colleges, Teaching English in the Two-Year College, The NWP Quarterly, and By the Flash of Fireflies: Teaching Short Fiction. She and her husband, Barry, live in Baltimore City. She is currently working on a collection of personal essays for her three granddaughters, Devorah, Tovah, and Aliyah.

    Correspondence: bbass@towson.edu

    Article: Abu's Lesson

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Rosa Aurora Chávez-Eakle, M.D., Ph.D.

    Chavez-Eakle Photo Dr. Chavez-Eakle studied Medicine and completed a Residency in Psychiatry, a M.Sc. in Clinical Research and a Ph.D. in Medical Sciences (Psychiatry and Creativity) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the National Institute of Psychiatry Ramon de la Fuente in Mexico City, where she founded and coordinated the Unit for the Study and Development of Creativity. She was Visiting Scholar at the Torrance Center for Creative Studies at the University of Georgia in 1999 and from 2001-2002, having the honor of being E. Paul Torrance's last student. From 2004-2005, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Chavez-Eakle is a LPC, NCC certified in Washington DC and a Psychoanalytic Candidate at the Washington Center for Psychoanalysis. She has taught the graduate courses Creativity and Human Development at the Johns Hopkins University. Her research and publications involve: (a) creativity, personality and psychopathology, (b) functional brain images during creative performance, (c) phenomenology and the creative process, (d) molecular genetic variations associated with creativity, and (e) creativity and psychotherapy, creativity and psychoanalysis. She is also a poet and prose writer. Dr. Chavez-Eakle has presented her research at international forums including: the American Psychiatric Association, the Human Genome Organization, the University of Liege, Belgium; the Institute of Neuroesthetics and the University of California at Berkeley, the Torrance Lecture at the University of Georgia, the National Institute of Psychiatry “Ramon de la Fuente” in México, the University of Maine, the Washington Center for Psychoanalysis, and the European Commission, part of the Executive Branch of the European Union. Dr. Chavez-Eakle currently serves at the Maryland State Department of Education Council for Gifted and Talented. Dr. Chavez-Eakle founded and directs the Washington International Center for Creativity.

    Correspondence: drchavezeakle@creativitywashington.com
    website: www.creativitywashington.com or call (202) 243-0595
    Washington International Center for Creativity
    5335 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 440
    Washington D.C. 20015


    Article: The Relevance of Creativity in Education

    Back to top

     
  • Patricia Joson Cruz, MAT

    Cruz Photo Ms. Cruz is the Education Director for the Maryland Chapter of Young Audiences/Arts for Learning, an Adjunct Professor for Towson University's Arts Integration Institute, Co-Director of the Maryland Teaching Artist Institute (TAI), and a facilitator for the Maryland Artist/Teacher Institute (MATI). Pat earned a Bachelor of Science in Art Education from Towson University and Masters in Teaching with a focus on Arts Integration from George Mason University. She taught for Baltimore County Public Schools for over ten years where she helped to develop and implement an arts integrated program titled ArtsSmart. The ArtsSmart program integrated drama, music, dance, and visual art with the reading and math curriculum. This program helped to significantly increase test scores in state mandated reading tests. In her last school, Halstead Academy, third grade Maryland State Assessment (MSA) reading scores increased by more than 38% after only two years of implementation of the ArtsSmart. Pat has been recognized as a "Rookie of the Year" by the Baltimore County Teachers Association, "Elementary Art Educator of the Year" by Baltimore County Schools, and "Outstanding Elementary Art Teacher” for Baltimore County by the Maryland Art Educators Association. In her position as Education Director for YA, Pat works with teachers and artists across the state to coordinate programs and provide professional development that integrate the arts into the lives of Maryland’s youth.

    Correspondence: patc@yamd.org, or call 410-837-7577 website: www.yamd.org

    Article: Bringing in the Village: Supporting Educators & Connecting to the World

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Ann De León, Ph.D.

    De Leon PhotoAnn De León received a BA in Biology from Wellesley College in 1999 and a PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures at The Johns Hopkins University in 2007 under the guidance of Dr. Sara Castro-Klarén. In 2007 she joined the Spanish/LAST section of MLCS as an Assistant Professor of Colonial Latin American Literatures and Cultural Studies. Currently, Ann is working on a book-length manuscript expanding upon her doctoral dissertation “The Production and Reproduction of “Aztec” Bodies: Translating Pictorial and Textual Discourses on the Human Body from Sahagún’s Florentine Codex (1579)” where she investigates the problem of multi-level translation of the Aztec body and the role of the translator in Sahagun’s (and over 400 post-Conquest indigenous collaborators) heterogeneous 16th century compendium on Aztec culture and religion and other colonial ethnographic texts. As part of her research she has studied Nahuatl with Dr. Jonathan Amith at Yale University, and Dr. John Sullivan at IDIEZ (Zacatecas, Mexico) and carried out original fieldwork on Nahua body terminology in Tepecxitla, Veracruz. Her research interests focus on an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American Literatures and Cultural Productions, transatlantic studies and post-colonial theory with emphasis on Mexico. She is particularly interested in Latin American Indigenous cultural productions, codices, the Aztec language (Nahuatl), poetry, translation, women’s studies, and theory on the body. Ann has published a book translation: Spanish King of the Incas by Ana-Maria Lorandi (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2005) and some articles: “Archeology, Monuments, and Writing the Mexican Nation: Antonio Penafiel and the 'Aztec' Palimpsest.” Colorado Review of Hispanic Studies 6 (2009), and “Coatlicue or How to Write the Dismembered Body” MLN Volume 125, No.2, March 2010 (Hispanic Issue). Ann is also writing some articles on how 19th century-scholars on both sides of the Atlantic interpreted, copied, and created their own compendiums on Aztec material culture, codices, and colonial texts.

    Correspondence: Ann.deleon@ualberta.ca website: http://web.mac.com/anndeleon

    Article: Texts Beyond the Alphabet: Strategies for Incorporating Visual Culture in the Teaching of Colonial Latin American Literature

    Back to top

     
  • Sharon Delgado. M.Ed.

    Delgado PhotoOver the course of her 40 year career, Sharon Delgado has taught elementary school students in both public and private schools located in urban, suburban, and rural communities. She also has taught in-service courses for school systems in Maryland and college courses for the Johns Hopkins School of Education and Towson University. In addition Sharon has written numerous curriculum guides and has presented at local, state, and national conferences. Currently she is a Reading Specialist at Jacksonville Elementary School located in Baltimore County, Maryland.

    Correspondence: sdelgado@bcps.org

    Article: Breaking Tradition in Kindergarten: Using Movement to Facilitate Students’ Accurate and Automatic Recall of Phoneme/Grapheme Associative Pairs

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Mariale Hardiman, Ed.D.

    Hardiman PhotoRecently appointed as interim dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, Dr. Mariale Hardiman joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2006 as Assistant Dean of Urban School Partnerships and Chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies after serving in the Baltimore City Public School System for more than 30 years. As the principal of Roland Park Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore, Dr. Hardiman led the school to its designation as a Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. During her tenure as principal, Dr. Hardiman devised a teaching framework, The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, which connects research-based effective instruction with elements from the brain sciences to inform teaching and learning. Continuing her interest of bringing to educators relevant findings from the brain sciences, Dr. Hardiman collaborated with colleagues from across the University and community to develop the JHU School of Education’s Neuro-Education Initiative, supported by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine’s Brain Science Institute. The Neuro-Education Initiative brings to educators relevant research on cognition and learning, including a national summits on topics such as Learning, Arts, and the Brain and Attention and Engagement in Learning. Dr. Hardiman recently launched a new graduate certificate in Mind, Brain, and Teaching, one of the few university programs in the country focusing on the science of learning. Dr. Hardiman is a national presenter on topics related to school leadership and the intersection of research in the neurosciences with effective teaching strategies, including meaningful integration of the arts. Her publications include “Connecting Brain Research with Dimensions of Learning,” Education Leadership (2001); Connecting Brain Research with Effective Teaching: the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model (Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2003); and “The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Classroom Instruction and School Reform” in the Praeger Handbook of Learning and the Brain (Greenwood Publishing Group, 2006). Recent publications include “The Arts Help School Accountability” (The Dana Foundation, 2009), “The Science of Education: Informing Teaching and Learning through the Brain Sciences” (with Martha Bridge Denckla, M.D., Cerebrum, 2009), and Neuroeducation: Learning, Arts, and the Brain (with Magsamen, McKhann, & Eilber, The Dana Foundation, 2009). Dr. Hardiman earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from Loyola College and her doctorate from Johns Hopkins University.

    Correspondence: mmhardiman@jhu.edu


    Article: The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model: A Brief Overview and Description of Brain Targets

    Back to top

     
  • Brian A. Jones, M.S.
    Jones PhotoAlthough working on his “grand unification of teaching theory” takes up quite a bit of his day-dreaming time, Brian Jones still is able to save stray cats from the upper boughs of trees, help old ladies across the street, and pick up his dry-cleaning (it is amazing how dirty his superhero cape gets on a daily basis). Using the latest technology, Jones has designed coursework in the areas of history, humanities, algebra, and biology, creating complete on-line high school courses in these fields. His post-graduate work in humanities has taken him to Rome, Athens, Tokyo, and Gotebo, Oklahoma. Every once in a while he shows up in his classroom, throws out the next topic of discussion for his students to debate, and then melds back into the shadows where he can plot his next overthrow attempt of the local school administration regime (he grew up down the street from his arch-nemesis, Principal Colvin, setting up the classic hero-knows-villain-knows-hero scenario). Working on his second decade of leading students down the paths of intellectual anarchy, Jones will admit under duress to flirting with the mundane by having the students read from the school textbook once a month. Jones uses his super-ADHD power to oscillate between being a middle school band director, humanities teacher, football videographer, playwright, archery coach, cheer-dad (his wife is the middle school cheerleading coach), and all-around trouble maker for the local school administration. Jones sets the bar high when it comes to reading level in his class: his sixth graders read Homer, Shakespeare, and Machiavelli; his seventh graders read Verne and H.G. Wells; and his eighth graders read Locke, Rousseau, and Stowe (“What? Legree has Uncle Tom killed?!? Mr. Jones, why do you make us read this?!”). Jones is constantly exposing the students in his class to the latest in brain research, memetic theory, and explorations of the gifted mind. He can’t believe they actually pay him to come to school…

    Correspondence: brian.a.jones@westernheights.k12.ok.us

    Article: The Many Hats of a Teacher

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. M.Layne Kalbfleisch, M.Ed., Ph.D.
    Kalbfleisch PhotoLayne Kalbfleisch [Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2001] is an assistant professor in the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study and the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University. Kalbfleisch is a unique trained scholar dually-trained as a cognitive neuroscientist and educational psychologist. She designed and engineered George Mason's MRI laboratory and was its director from 2007-2009. She is also former middle school teacher. Her transdisciplinary laboratory, KIDLAB, combines methods from educational psychology and cognitive neuroscience to center on two aims: (1) to pioneer methods for better representing "real world" cognition in the artificial functional MRI (fMRI) environment, and (2) to study the neural anatomies of talent characterized by twice exceptionality (high-ability individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), high-functioning autism, and dyslexia). KIDLAB's goal is to contribute new insight into how the brain develops, learns, creates, and solves problems throughout the lifespan to enable more strategic development of therapies, technology, educational environments, and medicine.

    Correspondence: mkalbfle@gmu.edu

    Article: KIDLAB’s STORY Program: A Transdisciplinary Model for Scientific Literacy and Community Involvement in Developmental Neuroimaging Research

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Charles Limb, M.D.

    Limb PhotoDr. Charles Limb is an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, where he specializes in neurotology and skull base surgery. He is also a Faculty Member at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and Director of Research of the Neuroeducation Initiative at the School of Education. He received his undergraduate degree at Harvard University and his medical training at Yale University, followed by surgical residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at Johns Hopkins with Dr. David Ryugo studying the development of the auditory brainstem, and a second postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health with Dr. Allen Braun studying neural mechanisms of music production and perception using functional neuroimaging methods. His current areas of research focus on the study of the neural basis of creativity as well as the study of music perception in deaf individuals with cochlear implants. His work has been featured by National Public Radio, National Geographic, Canadian Broadcasting Company, the New York Times, Associated Press, the Library of Congress, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the American Museum of Natural History.

    Correspondence: climb@jhmi.edu

    Article: Why Neuroeducation?

    Back to top

     
  • Brenda McLaughlin, M.P.P.

    McLaughlin PhotoBrenda leads the National Summer Learning Association's new and community initiatives, providing strategic direction and ensuring alignment between our organization’s overall goals and on-the-ground strategies. The initiatives team uses a combination of research, policy development, advocacy, professional development, quality assessment, resource alignment, data tracking, and evaluation to serve the summer learning community. Her team works to expand access and participation for low-income youth and families in summer programs through increased political support, alignment and sustainability of resources, enhanced knowledge and data sharing practices, and improved program quality. McLaughlin’s passion is strengthening connections between research, policy, and practice. Her background includes serving as director for research and evaluation at the National Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University, where she spent several years distilling effective practices, engaging in research projects, and providing technical assistance for summer providers. She is a recognized expert in the field of summer learning, regularly speaking to out-of-school-time professionals and the media. Recent publications include Meaningful Linkages between Summer Programs Schools and Community Partners: Conditions and Strategies for Success, and Summer Learning: Moving from the Periphery to the Core, a collaborative publication with Education Commission of the States. McLaughlin earned a master’s degree in public policy from Johns Hopkins University, and a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and Latin American Studies from the University of Pittsburgh.

    Correspondence: bmclaughlin@summerlearning.org

    Article: Why Summer Learning Deserves a Front-Row Seat in the Education Reform Arena

    Back to top

     
  • Citlali Miranda-Aldaco, M.A.

    Citlali PhotoCitlali is a doctoral candidate in education at the School of Education, Johns Hopkins University. She is currently teaching Spanish language and culture with technology, and Latin American Studies at Goucher College. Her academic background in engineering allows her to see the humanities from a different perspective, and vice versa. Miranda-Aldaco holds a BS in Industrial Engineering from the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, and an MA in Intercultural Communications from the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Her various research interests are closely related to Latinos in the US and to a better understanding of intercultural interactions. They include foreign language teaching and learning, biculturalism, technology-based instruction, bicultural use of Web 2.0 tools, multicultural education and training and, language and the sciences. (PHOTO BY HIPS / WILL KIRK )

    Correspondence: citlali@jhu.edu

    Article: Latino Literacy: 500 Years of Resistance

    Back to top

    Alexis Nardella

    Alexis Nardella is a special education teacher in Montgomery County Public Schools in Rockville, Maryland. She teaches in an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) class in a public separate day school for students with multiple disabilities. Alexis teaches students in grades kindergarten to second grade using a multi-modal approach to communication including sign language, voice-output devices, picture symbols, and computers to help students develop an effective communication system. She is a graduate of the University of Delaware with a degree in Elementary and Special Education and is currently pursuing a Master's Degree at Johns Hopkins University with certificates in Autism Education and Assistive Technology.

    Correspondence: anardella@jhu.edu

    Article: Case Study on Assistive Technology: Voices from the Field

    Back to top

     
  • Fabio Palacio

    Palacio PhotoPalacio is a sophomore in the Whiting School of Engineering studying International Relations. He is the team leader for the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Guatemala Team and has traveled on one assessment trip to Guatemala. His hometown is New Jersey.

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • Carolyn Purington

    Purington PhotoPurington is a senior in the Whiting School of Engineering studying Biomedical Engineering. She has been the team leader for the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Ecuador Team since her sophomore year and has traveled on one assessment trip and one implementation trip to Ecuador. Her hometown is Rutland, MA.

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • Jeffrey Smink, M.Ed.

    Smink PhotoAs Vice President of Policy for the National Summer Learning Association, Jeff leads all activities related to the Association’s policy portfolio at the national, state, and local levels. Current projects include leading a National Campaign for Summer Learning to increase public investment and support of summer programs; leading an initiative to create a new vision of summer school for urban school districts; and the creation of state-level legislative task forces on summer learning. Jeff also develops and delivers presentations and trainings at selected national, regional, and local policy conferences and meetings. Prior to his arrival at the Association, Jeff served in a variety of education policy positions, including Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary at the Pennsylvania Department of Education and legislative associate for the Council of Chief State School Officers. In both capacities, he was deeply involved in the development and implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and other education reform efforts. Jeff earned a Master of Education from Harvard University (2003) and a Bachelor of Arts from Allegheny College (1996).

    Article: Why Summer Learning Deserves a Front-Row Seat in the Education Reform Arena

    Correspondence: jsmink@summerlearning.org

    Back to top

     
  • Jessica Shiao

    Shiao PhotoShiao is a senior in the Whiting School of Engineering studying Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She has been a part of the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Ecuador Team since her freshman year and has been a part of the executive board since her sophomore year. Her hometown is Overland Park, KS.

    Correspondence: jess.shiao@gmail.com

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • James R. Stachowiak, MSE, ATP
    Stachowiak PhotoStachowiak is the Associate Director of the Iowa Center for Assistive Technology Education and Research (ICATER) in the College of Education at the University of Iowa. James is also the Project Director of the Universal Access project, demonstration project funded by the U.S. Department of Education that promotes the use of Universal Design for Learning as a means to provide quality higher education opportunities for students with disabilities. James has a BSE in Industrial and Operations Engineering and an MSE in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Michigan. James is a member of the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) and is a RESNA certified Assistive Technology Professional. James has also served three terms as the chair of RESNA’s Educator’s Professional Specialty Group.

    Correspondence: james-stachowiak@uiowa.edu

    Article: Universal Design for Learning in Postsecondary Institutions

    Back to top

     
  • Yourong Su

    Su PhotoSu is a senior in the Whiting School of Engineering studying Neuroscience. She has been the team leader for the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders South Africa Team since her sophomore year and has traveled on two implementation trips to South Africa. Her hometown is Atlanta, Georgia.

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • Nicholas Tourides, B.S.

    Touridas PhotoMr. Tourides is the Educational Advisor and American Program Coordinator for the Fulbright Foundation in Greece, which is the oldest Fulbright program in Europe and the second-oldest continuously operating Fulbright program in the world.
    Mr. Tourides has been with the Fulbright Foundation in Greece for the past 12 years. In his current position, he is responsible for providing non-biased information on U.S. Studies to both Greek and foreign nationals residing in Greece and for promoting U.S. education through various outreach activities. Mr. Tourides also coordinates the U.S. Fulbright program to Greece and assists its scholars prior to and throughout their grant periods. Mr. Nicholas Tourides holds a bachelor degree in Natural Sciences/Physics and has previously taught in the sciences and in computers.

    Correspondence: advisor@fulbright.gr

    Article: "How Can Words Express the Feeling of Becoming Culturally Wealthy?"

    Back to top

     
  • Michael Wheeler

    Wheeler PhotoWheeler is a junior in the Whiting School of Engineering studying Biomedical Engineering. He has been the team leader for the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders South Africa Team since his sophomore years and has traveled on three assessment and implementation trips to South Africa. His hometown is Cape May, New Jersey.

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • Dr. Judy Willis, MD, M.Ed

    Willis PhotoAfter graduating Phi Beta Kappa as the first woman graduate from Williams College, Judy Willis attended UCLA School of Medicine where she was awarded her medical degree. She remained at UCLA and completed a medical residency and neurology residency, including chief residency. She practiced neurology for fifteen years before returning to university to obtain her Teaching Credential and Masters of Education from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She taught in elementary and middle school for the past ten years. Dr. Willis is an authority in brain research regarding learning and the brain and is a presenter at educational conferences and professional development workshops nationally and internationally about classroom strategies derived from this research. She has been a Distinguished Lecturer at ASCD national conferences, writes extensively for professional educational journals, and was honored as a 2007 Finalist for Distinguished Achievement Award for her educational writing by the Association for Educational Publishers.

    Correspondence: jwillisneuro@aol.com website: RADTeach.com

    Article: Teaching Students A "Brain Owner's Manual"

    Back to top

     
  • Jie Zhang

    Zhang PhotoZhang is a senior in the Whiting School of Engineering studying Electrical Engineering. He was the team leader for the Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Guatemala Team during his sophomore and junior years and has traveled on one assessment trip to Guatemala. His hometown is Beijing, China.

    Article: The Johns Hopkins University Chapter of Engineers Without Borders Overview, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, and International Partnerships

    Back to top

     
  • Leighann Pennington, M.Ed.

    Pennington PhotoPennington currently teaches 6th grade English and History at TVT Community Day School in Orange County, California. She received her Bachelor’s in Creative Writing from Miami University and studied Gifted Education at the University of Virginia. She also teaches at Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth (CTY). Continually active in her field, Ms. Pennington has presented papers at professional conferences on Innovative Programs for Gifted Students. She is also Editor of the newsletter for the Curriculum Studies Network of the National Association for Gifted Children.

    Correspondence: Leighann.Pennington@gmail.com

    Article: Intergalactic Interdisciplinary Curriculum: Our Place in the Universe

    Back to top

Search New Horizons

 

New Horizons Links

New Horizons home

About Us (NHFL)

Current Journal

Submission Guidelines

Subscribe

Follow us on Facebook, Linked In, and Twitter!

Facebook Icon Twitter Icon LinkedIn Icon

New Horizons Shop

Featured Item: Research-Based Strategies to Ignite Student Learning: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

By Judy Willis | Purchase

Visit the New Horizons store on Amazon.com for more selections

New Horizons store on Amazon.com