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Vol. IX No. 1, Winter 2011 Journal

Browse Abstracts - Browse Authors

Table of Contents



Mind, Brain and Education Science Series:

Dr. Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D.

1. Why Mind, Brain, and Education Science is the "New" Brain-Based Education

2. What Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE)Science Can Do for Teaching

3. Who Knows Most About Learning? or, Why the Brain is Not Talked About in Schools

4. A Brief History of the Science of Learning: Part 1 (3500 B.C.E.-1970 C.E.)

5. A Brief History of the Science of Learning: Part 2 (1970s-present)

The Effects of ADHD (Beyond Decoding Accuracy) on Reading Fluency and Comprehension
Dr. E. Mark Mahone, Ph.D., ABPP

Teaching Students with ADHD to F.O.C.U.S.: A Learning Strategy
Dr. Victoria Groves Scott, Ed.D & Kendra Fark

The Worldview Literacy Project: Exploring New Capacities for the 21st Century Student
Dr. Marilyn Mandala Schlitz, Ph.D., Dr. Cassandra Vieten, Ph.D., Elizabeth Miller, Ken Homer, Dr. Katia Peterson, Ph.D., & Kathleen Erickson-Freeman

The Renton Way; Launching Learning to Last a Lifetime
Dr. Mary Alice Heuschel, Ed.D.

Exploring the Relationship between National Board Certification and High School Student Achievement
Geary Don Crofford, Dr. Jon E. Pedersen, Ph.D. & Dr. Gregg Garn, Ph.D.

Citizen Education at the Crossroads: The Creation of a Future Forward College
Carol Cutler-White, M.P.A. & Rick Smyre, M.S.

M-Learning: Promises, Perils, and Challenges for K-12 Education
Dr. Patricia Wallace, Ph.D.

Don't Smile Until Christmas: The Promise of Positive Psychology in the Classroom
Dr. Patty O'Grady, Ph.D.

Transforming Urban School Counselor Preparation for the Next Century
Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, Ph.D., Dr. Anita Young, Ph.D. & Ileana Gonzalez, M.Ed., Ed.S.


Featured Education Sites

Rus VanWestervelt has been working with students for over 20 years in middle, high school, undergraduate, and graduate programs throughout the state of Maryland. Specializing in English, writing, publications, photography, and theater, Rus currently teaches students at Centennial High School and Towson University. As a Teacher-Consultant with the Maryland Writing Project, Rus has devoted many summers to fostering learning communities for on-going professional development through writing at the Invitational Summer Teacher Institute. Through creating and contributing to numerous online sites, his example is able to benefit teachers and writers of all ages including yours truly.

Traces of a Life Lived Deliberately
http://rusvw.net/blog/archives/1612


In this post, the discrepencies in the ratio of work written to work shared by writers in relation to the proportion of work evaluated to work written in schools are highlighted. Contribute your voice to the conversation about teaching writing in our schools.

Write Anything
http://writeanything.wordpress.com/2011/02/27/rus-vanwestervelt-authentic-writing


Another forum to spread his authentic writing message, Write Anything is the newest place to catch Rus sharing his secrets. Practice what you teach on this site and explore possibilities for you and your students.

Cool Blue Souls
http://coolbluesouls.com


Cool Blue Souls Rus and his co-conspirator Cara Moulds inspire writers to contemplate, connect, and create to find the pearl in all of us. Beware, you may be so moved you enroll in Noanowrimo Bootcamp and join the crazy ranks of writers writing a novel in a month!

Maryland Voices
http://www.marylandvoices.com

more information: http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/2256


Begun in 2001 to capture the reactions of Maryland residents to the September 11 attacks, Maryland Voices quickly evolved into a journal designed and edited by high school students devoted to publishing the creative nonfiction of their peers. Visit Maryland Voices to see exiting plans for the next phase in development.



Abstracts



Mind, Brain and Education Science Series:
Dr. Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D.

The following series consist of excerpts from Mind, Brain, and Education Science: A comprehensive guide to the new brain-based teaching (W.W. Norton) a book based on over 4,500 studies and with contributions from the world's leaders in MBE Science.


1. Why Mind, Brain, and Education Science is the "New" Brain-Based Education

The complex problems faced in education today need equally elaborate solutions. This article explains how Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) science combines perspectives from neuroscience, psychology and pedagogy that contribute to a better understanding of how humans learn, and consequently, how we should teach. Better than neuro-education, more powerful than cognitive psychology and easier to understand than cognitive neuroscience, MBE is a paradigm shift in our understanding of the teaching profession.

2. What Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) Science Can Do for Teaching
If the combination of neuroscience, psychology and education (Mind, Brain, and Education science) is the way we should approach teaching from now on, what exactly are the lessons we can apply to the classroom? This article looks at five well-established facts whose evidence points to better teaching practices.

3. Who Knows Most About Learning? or, Why the Brain is Not Talked About in Schools
Neuroscientists think about cells. Psychologists think about frames of mind. Educators think about students. A Mind, Brain, and Education scientist can think on all three levels, and as a result has more viable and effective solutions than other professionals concerned with the teaching-learning process. This article considers some of the different viewpoints that are afforded by wearing the new MBE hat and suggests that anyone concerned with improving education should use this view.

4. A Brief History of the Science of Learning: Part 1 (3500 B.C.E.-1970 C.E.)
The history of how we teach is fascinating. By understanding not only how people learn but also how we have learned how to teach, we can become better professionals. In this article we review the history of human learning and the progress of teaching over the past 5,500 years.

5. A Brief History of the Science of Learning: Part 2 (1970s-present)
Born during this period, the discipline of Mind, Brain Education Science has already encountered much challenge and skeptism during a struggle to achieve a healthy balance between research and practice. This article continues the historical exploration of human learning and the progress of teaching begun in the previous excerpt and focuses on the journey of MBE from the 1970s to 2010.


The Effects of ADHD (Beyond Decoding Accuracy) on Reading Fluency and Comprehension
Dr. E. Mark Mahone, Ph.D., ABPP

In upper-elementary grades and beyond, students are expected to independently read (and learn from) longer, more challenging texts than at younger ages. This review examines how processing speed and working memory deficits associated with ADHD impact reading fluency and comprehension. The emphasis is on children who do not have basic word reading difficulties. First, children with ADHD have slowed response times on nearly all speeded tasks. Results from investigation of reaction time suggest a delay (slowing) in "response selection/preparation" process among children with ADHD, which is consistent with neuroimaging evidence showing anomalous development of the supplementary motor cortex, thought to be responsible for response control and efficiency of reading. Second, even children who read accurately may not understand what they read because of executive dysfunction - including working memory limitations, poor inference making, and ineffective comprehension monitoring. In summary, there is a strong suggestion that reduced processing speed and working memory associated with ADHD (even that observed in the absence of reading and language difficulties) may influence reading fluency and comprehension via a variety of neurobiological and neuropsychological processes, including automaticity, interference during multitasking, and reduced proficiency with motor and oculomotor function.


Teaching Students with ADHD to F.O.C.U.S.: A Learning Strategy
Dr. Victoria Groves Scott, Ed.D & Kendra Fark

Students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often face academic challenges, one of which is listening to and following directions. As this skill is important in many daily activities, it warrants attention in intervention. Teaching students learning strategies is an effective way for students to learn new behaviors. This article describes a learning strategy called FOCUS that can help students with ADHD improve their listening. The article explains how to teach this strategy to students, provide them with practice, and then evaluate the effectiveness of FOCUS used in a variety of contexts.


The Worldview Literacy Project: Exploring New Capacities for the 21st Century Student
Dr. Marilyn Mandala Schlitz, Ph.D., Dr. Cassandra Vieten, Ph.D., Elizabeth Miller, Ken Homer, Dr. Katia Peterson, Ph.D., & Kathleen Erickson-Freeman

This paper overviews The Worldview Literacy Project, an experiential pedagogy designed to increase students' awareness of their worldviews. The curriculum opens a conversational space of exploration where diverse worldviews are welcomed with curiosity and wonder, in service to creating the deeper collective understanding and more effective sense-making required to navigate life in the post-industrial age. Designed to be used in middle school and high schools, the curriculum explores the pivotal role that worldview, perspective or point of view plays in perception, information processing and behavior. We offer a frame of reference out of which the project was developed, overview the elements of the curriculum, and present pilot data and observations from high school classrooms. Qualitative results from the pilot program were generated through classroom observation, teacher interviews, and student essays and interviews. Results suggest that the Worldview Literacy Project had beneficial effects on students' development. The project appears to provide a platform from which students can better navigate complexity, be more self-aware, and make choices with greater discernment. We found that students expressed a greater capacity for self-reflection and empathy, experienced more comfort and less reactivity to unfamiliar situations, and displayed a greater sense of in-group and community identification. In addition, teachers reported that students were more engaged in the learning process, demonstrated greater attentiveness and class participation, and showed notable improvement in the quality of verbal communication and writing skills. We discuss plans to take the web based project to a broader audience through dissemiation of a web based curriculum grounded in focused teacher training


The Renton Way; Launching Learning to Last a Lifetime
Dr. Mary Alice Heuschel, Ed.D.

The 2011 Washington State Superintendent of the Year and one of four finalists for 2011 National Superintendent of the Year, Renton Schools Superintendent Dr. Mary Alice Heuschel, shares her vision and supportive attitude which have helped her make a difference in Renton's results. These achievements include allotting only 7% of the budget for central administration, a 93% on time graduation rate with 89% of high school graduates attending college. Also included in the article is the improvement model for the Renton School District Guided by the mission: In partnership with the community, provide a safe and respectful learning environment for all students to realize academic, social and personal achievement: Launching Learning to Last a Lifetime.


Exploring the Relationship between National Board Certification and High School Student Achievement
Geary Don Crofford, Dr. Jon E. Pedersen, Ph.D. & Dr. Gregg Garn, Ph.D.

This exploratory paper examines the relationship between the number of National Board Certified teachers (NBCTs) in a mid-western state in the US and student achievement, as measured by End of Instruction exam scores in three secondary subject areas. Using state-wide data obtained from the state's Department of Education we found that the number of NBCTs in high schools is positively and significantly correlated to student achievement as measured by state required End-Of-Instruction exams (EOIs), in Biology I, Reading, and Mathematics. This correlation varies when the data is disaggregated according to the campuses' locale, size, and Title I status. Further analysis showed this relationship may be independent of other factors, and in fact number of NBCTs can be considered a predictor of EOI scores in most cases. The results suggest that districts and states that encourage and reward teachers who pursue national board certification receive a return on their financial investment in terms of increased student achievement as measured by end of instruction exams.


Citizen Education at the Crossroads: The Creation of a Future Forward College
Carol Cutler-White, M.P.A & Rick Smyre, M.S.

Consulting with leadership at Wake Tech Community College to help them develop a concept for a Future Forward College based on our COTF ideas and methods...especially Transformational Learning. Community colleges require a new system of learning and operation to achieve the goal of preparing students of all ages to be adaptive learners. The movement beyond traditional education and operations to an organic system of learning is what we refer to as a Future Forward College. It is in the spirit of Ogle's emphasis on imagination, insight and intuition that the name Future Forward is used. The Center for Strategic Futures (a futures institute) at Wake Tech Community College in Raleigh, NC will be the incubator for this emerging idea. The goal is moving the college faculty, staff, and students from a system built on looking backward at history to a system built on looking forward.


M-Learning: Promises, Perils, and Challenges for K-12 Education
Dr. Patricia Wallace, Ph.D.

With cell phone ownership expanding to more students at younger ages, the prospect of leveraging these devices for learning is generating considerable discussion and debate among educators. Sorting out the promises and perils for m-learning is itself a challenge because research in this area is limited and the technology's capabilities are changing rapidly. Nevertheless, the potential for mobile devices to make substantial contributions to education is high. Evidence-based knowledge about how to use computers effectively, drawn from research in education, psychology, communications, neuroscience, engineering, and other disciplines, will help us avoid past missteps. The promise and potential of learning through mobile phones is investigated in this article which includes example videos of accessing courses in the CTYOnline program offered by the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth.


Don't Smile Until Christmas: The Promise of Positive Psychology in the Classroom
Dr. Patty O'Grady, Ph.D.

New and novice teachers struggle with managing their classrooms, particularly in urban, disadvantaged schools. Conventional wisdom, teacher bias, and other factors are barriers to adopting the new research in the area of positive psychology. The paper overviews positive psychology principles, connects the positive psychology research to the neuroscience research, classroom climate research, social emotional learning research, resiliency research, and restorative justice research. The author suggests that teachers begin to infuse positive psychology into the traditional curriculum to improve student outcomes. Suggested activities that deploy positive psychology strategies into the classroom are presented.


Transforming Urban School Counselor Preparation for the Next Century
Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy,Ph.D., Dr. Anita Young, Ph.D. & Ileana Gonzalez, M.Ed., Ed.S.

The purpose of this article is two-fold; one, to describe the critical needs that school counselors will be expected to address in 21st century urban, inner city, and/or metropolitan schools and two, to describe our proposed framework for training effective school counselors who will be prepared to work in those schools. The authors propose a transformed framework for urban school counselor preparation is needed in order for counselors to meet the extensive needs of urban school communities. Further, a transformative approach to urban school counselor preparation where faculty create varied and extensive opportunities for pre-service school counselors to connect what they learn in didactic courses (e.g., lecture courses) to actual practice in urban schools while under the supervision of skilled, master urban school counselors is warranted. More importantly, the authors propose that pre-service urban school counselors gather data about their practices and evaluate whether or not students are influenced by counselor interventions.

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