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Urban Education

Urban areas throughout the United States combine a rich diversity of race, ethnicity, language, culture and class with high concentrations of poverty. The 18-credit Graduate Certificate in Urban Education will assist early-career certified teachers and other education professionals in understanding, valuing, and contributing to the rich tapestry of schools and communities in urban and urbanizing settings in order to enhance learning outcomes for all students.  The certificate prepares educational professionals to work in urban environments through a focus on building a deep understanding of urban residents; creating strong partnerships between schools, families, and communities; and developing the leadership skills necessary for leading change initiatives related to urban education. Through core course activities and individual preparation, participants will demonstrate an understanding of and competencies in:

  • Understanding the interrelationships of race, class and culture in urban classrooms.
  • Communicating effectively within the school and parent community.
  • Engaging community resources to enhance learning experiences.
  • Building leadership capacity within the school setting.
  • Linking school and classroom practices with systemic initiatives.
  • Understanding the implications of recent research about urban school reform.

The certificate offers three different tracks, including pedagogy, policy, and partnerships.  Students in each track take the same three core courses.  Each track also includes two additional specialization courses, as well as one research course, as described below.

Information Session

View an online information session that took place with Dr. Margaret Brown to learn more about the program. The session can be accessed at http://connect.johnshopkins.edu/p94157026/.

Core Coursework

851.630 School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I
Participants examine the theory, research, and best practices on school, family, and community partnerships. Individuals explore different types of partnerships, challenges to developing school-based partnership programs, and the components of effective partnership programs that enhance student performance and success. Participants design an action plan for partnerships to address school improvement goals.
880.611 The Social Context of Urban Education
In this course, participants will explore, critique, and create lessons and activities that utilize all learners’ intellectual, social, and emotional styles that make up their cultural ways of knowing and doing. Participants will be introduced to a variety of strategies and practices that link home, school, and community experiences that nurture and foster students’ strengths and accomplishments. This course will emphasize the creation of classroom environments that are affirming, respectful and intellectually rigorous.
880.613 Teaching, Learning and Leadership for Successful Urban Schools
This course will examine the principles, policies, and practices of leadership and instruction that promote effective schools. Students will be exposed to the Effective Schools Correlates, the principles of the Coalition of Essential Schools and numerous efforts on the local and state and federal level designed to improve the quality of education particularly as those practices and policies affect urban student achievement. Students will weigh the traditional patterns of teaching, learning, and governance with current federal, state, and local standards and new evidence-based, collaborative practices. Emphasis will be placed on examining models and methodologies currently in use in Baltimore City Public Schools and other local metropolitan areas. Students will use this research and knowledge as a basis for selecting effective methods that could be adapted to their particular setting.

Specialization Courses

Pedagogy:

810.607 Culturally Responsive Teaching
Candidates will explore the social, organizational, and structural factors influencing educational opportunities, experiences, and outcomes of culturally diverse students. Through personal reflection and analysis, candidates will determine the best way for them to positively impact students, regardless of ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, etc. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (2-3 credits)
880.603 Educating the Whole Child: Teaching to the Developmental Needs of the Urban Child
This course will focus participants’ learning on child and adolescent development consistent with developmental pathways: cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social, and physical. Topics include the needs of urban school children relative to health care, nutrition, differentiation, inclusion, special education, gifted education, arts education, higher order thinking and creative problem-solving.

Policy:

880.617 Urban School Reform
This course examines systemic school reform movements in the urban school context. School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, merit-pay, and alternative routes to teaching. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in urban schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students in urban schools.
851.512 Politics of Education
Federal involvement in education has grown enormously in recent decades with calls for national standards and increasing reliance on standardized tests. While state legislatures and school boards traditionally provide funding and policy, mayors, parents and advocates of charter schools are seeking to redefine the nature of local control. Education leaders should understand the politics of education; the swiftly changing balance of power; and how education politics is practiced between and within the levels of government and the public. Students will study and analyze current issues and case studies that focus on the politics of education.

Partnerships:

880.617 Urban School Reform
This course examines systemic school reform movements in the urban school context. School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, merit-pay, and alternative routes to teaching. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in urban schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students in urban schools.
851.631 School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement II
Building on the knowledge and skills developed in 851.630 (School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I), students continue to explore research-based theories and best practices in school, family, and community collaboration. The emphasis of this second course in the sequence is on students revising, implementing, and evaluating a key activity in the action plan for partnerships developed in 851.630.

Research Courses (choose one)

880.624 Evaluation and Research in Education
This course is an introduction to research design and methodology for students working toward a master's degree or graduate certificate within the School of Education. It enables students to design a research project proposal while developing the intellectual tools needed to critique research within a designated area of specialization. This seminar will be invaluable for students who will be completing an action research project or master's thesis as a requirement for graduation.
881.611 Action Research for School Improvement
Students explore the role of the educator as an action researcher, with special emphasis on formulating and refining research questions as well as on selecting appropriate methodologies for classroom or school-based research. Students review research as a tool for assessing and improving teaching/learning environments.
 

Gainful Employment Disclosure

In accordance with US Department of Education regulations, the JHU School of Education is required to disclose graduation rate data, median loan debt data, and other select information for all Title IV eligible gainful employment programs. To see the most recent data available for this gainful employment program, please view the attached disclosure.

 
 

Contact Us

Faculty Contact
Dr. Eric Rice

Academic Coordinator
Kyuanna Napper